September 13, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update: Workshop Summary
      Source: National Academies Press - September 11, 2012
  2. NIH Expands Safe Infant Sleep Outreach Effort
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health - September 12, 2012
  3. Practices for Promoting Young Children's Learning in QRIS Standards
      Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - September 13, 2012
  4. Two New Research Syntheses from the Center for Early Literacy Learning
      Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - September 13, 2012
  5. Expanding Access to Early Head Start: State Initiatives for Infants and Toddlers at Risk
      Source: CLASP and ZERO TO THREE - September 13, 2012
  6. Sleep Problems Before Age 5 Associated with Greater Need for Special Education at Age 8
      Source: Pediatrics - September 3, 2012
  7. One in Four Children under Age 6 in the U.S. Lives in Poverty
      Source: U.S. Census Bureau - September 12, 2012

1. From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update: Workshop Summary

Source: National Academies Press - September 11, 2012

The National Academies Press has released a new report, From Neurons to Neighborhoods: An Update: Workshop Summary (2012), which is now available full-text online. The report is based on the original study, From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Early Childhood Development (October, 2000), which has contributed to a growing public understanding of the foundational importance of the early childhood years and helped shape early childhood policy agendas and intervention efforts at national, state, and local levels. In 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Research Council (NRC) held a 2-day workshop in Washington, D.C. to review and commemorate a decade of advances related to the mission of the original study. This new report provides a summary of the proceedings and conclusions from that workshop.

2. NIH Expands Safe Infant Sleep Outreach Effort

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health - September 12, 2012

On September 12, 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that the U.S. national campaign to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has entered a new phase and will now encompass all sleep-related, sudden unexpected infant deaths. The campaign, which has been known as the Back to Sleep Campaign, has been renamed the Safe to Sleep Campaign. A new one-page fact sheet, What does a safe sleep environment look like (September 2012), shows how to provide a safe sleep environment and lists ways that parents and caregivers can reduce the risk for SIDS. See the full NIH News Release for additional information and resources.

3. Practices for Promoting Young Children's Learning in QRIS Standards

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - September 13, 2012

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has released a new publication, Practices for Promoting Young Children's Learning in QRIS Standards (September 2012), by Sheila Smith, Taylor Robbins, Shannon Stagman, and J. Lee Kreader. This brief provides an examination of the strength of supports for children's early learning in Quality Rating Improvement System (QRIS) standards based on an analysis of QRIS standards in 23 states.

4. Two New Research Syntheses from the Center for Early Literacy Learning

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - September 13, 2012

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has published the following two new CELLreviews, which provide practice-based research syntheses of early literacy learning studies.

Assistive Technology and the Communication and Literacy Development of Young Children with Disabilities (2012), by Carl J. Dunst, Carol M. Trivette, Deborah W. Hamby, CELLreviews, 5(7).

Effect of Interest-Based Interventions on the Social-Communicative Behavior of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (2012), by Carl J. Dunst, Carol M. Trivette, Deborah W. Hamby. CELLreviews, 5(6)

5. Expanding Access to Early Head Start: State Initiatives for Infants and Toddlers at Risk

Source: CLASP and ZERO TO THREE - September 13, 2012

On September 13, 2012, CLASP and ZERO TO THREE (ZTT) released a new report, Expanding Access to Early Head Start: State Initiatives for Infants and Toddlers at Risk (September 2012). The report highlights current state initiatives to expand and enhance Early Head Start (EHS) services for at-risk infants, toddlers, and their families.

6. Sleep Problems Before Age 5 Associated with Greater Need for Special Education at Age 8

Source: Pediatrics - September 3, 2012

A recently published article in Pediatrics (September 3, 2012) reports that children with disrupted sleep patterns through five years of age were more likely to have special education needs (SEN) at eight years old. A prior history of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms was associated with a 40% greater chance of SEN; children with the worst SDB symptoms had a 60% greater chance of SEN. For each year of behavioral sleep problems, there was a 7% increased chance of SEN. The findings are based on more than 11,000 children in southwest England and highlight the need for early identification and management of both respiratory and behavioral sleep problems. See the abstract here. See also, a related article published in WebMD on Sept. 4, 2012 - Sleep Problems Linked to More Special Ed

Full citation: Bonuck, K., Rao, T., & Xu, L. (2012). Population-based cohort study pediatric sleep disorders and special educational need at 8 years: A population-based cohort study. Pediatrics, published online September 3, 2012. doi: 10.1542/peds.2012-0392

7. One in Four Children under Age 6 in the U.S. Lives in Poverty

Source: U.S. Census Bureau - September 12, 2012

A newly released report from the U.S. Census Bureau, Income, Poverty and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011 (September 2012), shows that in 2011 the poverty rate for children under age 6 was 24.5% (5.8 million children). More than half (57.2%) of children under age 6 living in families with a female householder were in poverty. This is more than four and a half times the rate of young children living in married-couple families (12.1%). Early childhood poverty is linked to a number of negative long-term outcomes.