July 6, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. LEAP Preschool: An Inclusive Model of Early Autism Intervention
      Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - Retrieved July 6, 2012
  2. An Integrated Approach to Supporting Child Development
      Source: PolicyLab at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Retrieved July 3, 2012
  3. New NAEYC Collection of Resources For Families
      Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - retrieved July 6, 2012
  4. Children's Budget 2012
      Source: First Focus - June 27, 2012
  5. Research Findings - Infants Born at 37-38 Weeks Have Increased Risk of Developmental Delays
      Source: Pediatrics - July 2, 2012

1. LEAP Preschool: An Inclusive Model of Early Autism Intervention

Source: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children - Retrieved July 6, 2012

The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) has posted a recorded on-line presentation and related materials on its Web site, entitled LEAP Preschool: An Inclusive Model of Early Autism Intervention. In this webinar, Phil Strain and Ted Bovey introduce the LEAP Preschool Model, an inclusive, evidence-based model for young children with autism that was founded in 1981. The webinar discusses key model components, key research findings on the intervention strategies and the outcomes for children in the program, and key lessons learned about preschool inclusion for young children with autism.

2. An Integrated Approach to Supporting Child Development

Source: PolicyLab at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - Retrieved July 3, 2012

PolicyLab at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has published a new Evidence to Action brief, SERIES: An Integrated Approach to Supporting Child Development (Summer 2012), which discusses the need to promote a more coordinated approach to ensuring that children with identified developmental needs are linked to appropriate services. The brief proposes the adoption of the SERIES paradigm of developmental screening, in which each step - Screening, Early identification, Referral, Intake, Evaluation, and Services - is viewed not as an isolated activity, but rather as an integral component of a single process.

3. New NAEYC Collection of Resources For Families

Source: National Association for the Education of Young Children - retrieved July 6, 2012

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) has developed a new Web page providing a collection of resources specifically For Families. The new page features Families Today, a column by Doctors T. Berry Brazelton and Joshua Sparrow, information on quality child care and preschool programs, plus an NAEYC-Accredited program search.

4. Children's Budget 2012

Source: First Focus - June 27, 2012

First Focus recently published Children's Budget 2012, an analysis of more than 180 federal investments in children. The report finds that discretionary spending on children has declined for two consecutive years, overall investments in children declined in 2012, relative to 2011, and the share of federal spending going to children decreased by 6% as American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds ran out. On a positive note, the report finds that spending on early childhood increased by 2.8% percent in inflation-adjusted spending from 2008 to 2012, mostly from a $700 million increase in Head Start from 2010 to 2012. An interactive version of the new report allows users to compare investments by program and/or funding category.

5. Research Findings - Infants Born at 37-38 Weeks Have Increased Risk of Developmental Delays

Source: Pediatrics - July 2, 2012

Research has shown that infants born at 34-36 weeks' gestation ("late preterm") have an increased risk of developmental delays. New study findings show that infants born at 37-38 weeks' gestation ("at term") are also at risk. The study analyzed data from 128,050 babies born between 37 and 41 weeks' gestation in New York City. Researchers found that reading and math scores in third grade for children born at 37-38 weeks were significantly lower than those of children born at 39-41 weeks. This effect was independent of birth weight, as well as a number of other obstetric, individual-level, and community-level socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. The findings suggest that clinicians and parents should consider the link between weeks of gestation and school performance, especially when considering elective early deliveries for nonmedical reasons.

Full citation: Kimberly G. Noble, K.G, Fifer, W.P., Rauh, V.A., Nomura, Y., Andrews, H.F. (2012). Academic achievement varies with gestational age among children born at term. Pediatrics. Published online July 2, 2012.