May 18, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. CDC Lowers Lead-Poisoning Threshold for Kids
      Source: HealthDay, U.S. National Library of Medicine - May 16, 2012
  2. Preschool and School Readiness: Experiences of Children with Non-English-Speaking Parents
      Source: Public Policy Institute of California - May 17, 2012
  3. Ensuring School Stability and Seamless Transitions for Children with Disabilities in the Child Welfare System
      Source: American Bar Association's Center on Children and the Law - May 17, 2012
  4. Nutrition in the First 1,000 Days: State of the World's Mothers 2012
      Source: Save the Children - May 18, 2012
  5. Relationship Between Early Childhood Practitioner Beliefs and the Adoption of Innovative and Recommended Practices
      Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved May 18, 2012

1. CDC Lowers Lead-Poisoning Threshold for Kids

Source: HealthDay, U.S. National Library of Medicine - May 16, 2012

On May 16, 2012, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lowered the threshold for what's considered lead poisoning in young children from 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood to 5 micrograms, marking the first time in 20 years that the acceptable level of lead in the bloodstream has been reduced. The change means that many more children could be diagnosed with lead poisoning (the current number is 250,000), a condition that has been linked to developmental delays and a lower IQ. To learn more, see the announcement from HealthDay, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine - CDC Lowers Lead-Poisoning Threshold for Kids (May 16, 2012). See also, an announcement from the American Academy of Pediatrics commending the CDC for its action.

2. Preschool and School Readiness: Experiences of Children with Non-English-Speaking Parents

Source: Public Policy Institute of California - May 17, 2012

The Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) has published a new report, Preschool and School Readiness Experiences of Children with Non-English-Speaking Parents by Jill S. Cannon, Alison Jacknowitz, and Lynn A. Karoly (May 2012), which shows that linguistically isolated children (children living in households without any adult English speaker) who participate in center-based care in the U.S. the year before they enter kindergarten significantly improve their early reading skills compared to those who do not participate; however the gains are similar to those of children of U.S. natives, so the readiness gap between the two groups does not appreciably change. The authors suggest that more targeted programs may be needed to close school readiness gaps between linguistically isolated children and children of non-immigrant parents. See also, a related blog post from CLASP, English Language Learners Benefit from Preschool.

3. Ensuring School Stability and Seamless Transitions for Children with Disabilities in the Child Welfare System

Source: American Bar Association's Center on Children and the Law - May 17, 2012

The American Bar Association's Center on Children and the Law has published a new issue brief, How the IDEA and the Fostering Connections Act Can Work Together to Ensure School Stability and Seamless Transitions for Children with Disabilities in the Child Welfare System (2012). The brief discusses the legal requirements of two federal laws and how they can be used to help ensure that children in foster care who have or may have a disability receive the services they need to achieve at high levels and be successfully integrated into their communities.

4. Nutrition in the First 1,000 Days: State of the World's Mothers 2012

Source: Save the Children - May 18, 2012

Save the Children recently published the 13th State of the World's Mothers report, which compares 165 countries around the globe on factors such as a mother's health, education and economic status, as well as critical child indicators. This year, Norway ranks 1st and the United States ranks 25th. The 2012 report, Nutrition in the First 1,000 Days: State of the World's Mothers 2012, focuses on nutrition as one of the key factors in determining mothers' and their children's well-being. It finds that as many as 2.6 million of the world's children and 100,000 mothers die from malnutrition every year. Additionally, one in four children struggle with the physical and mental impairments of being chronically undernourished or "stunted."

5. Relationship Between Early Childhood Practitioner Beliefs and the Adoption of Innovative and Recommended Practices

Source: Tots 'n Tech Research Institute - Retrieved May 18, 2012

The Tots 'n Tech Research Institute has published a new research synthesis, Relationship Between Early Childhood Practitioner Beliefs and the Adoption of Innovative and Recommended Practices (2012), by Carol M. Trivette, Carl J. Dunst, Deborah W. Hamby and Diana Meter. The synthesis sheds light on the nature of belief-practice linkages and underscores the need for more research on the kinds of belief appraisals held by early childhood practitioners and how those beliefs influence their adoption and use of different kinds of early childhood intervention practices.