March 23, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. New Research Findings on the Readiness Gap Between Wealthy and Poor Children
      Source: Brookings Institute and Stanford University - March 19, 2012
  2. The Importance of Emotional Support for Mothers
      Source: Child Trends - March 21, 2012
  3. The "Dual-Generation Strategy" Theory of Change
      Source: Ray Marshall Center - Retrieved March 23, 2012
  4. Grant Notice - Preparation of Special Education, Early Intervention, and Related Services Leadership Personnel
      Source: U.S. Education Department - March 22, 2012

1. New Research Findings on the Readiness Gap Between Wealthy and Poor Children

Source: Brookings Institute and Stanford University - March 19, 2012

The Brookings Institute recently published a new report, Starting School at a Disadvantage: The School Readiness of Poor Children (March 2012) by Julia B. Isaacs, which shows that only 48% of poor children are ready for school at age five, compared to 75% of children from families with moderate and high income, a 27 percentage point gap. The paper discusses why poor children are less ready for school and evaluates three interventions that can improve their school readiness.

On a related note, new findings from a Stanford study show that the gap in test scores between wealthy and poor children has grown by about 40% since 1960 and is now nearly twice as large as the black-white achievement gap. The Stanford researcher who conducted the study suggests that early childhood interventions might be the best way to start bridging the gap.

2. The Importance of Emotional Support for Mothers

Source: Child Trends - March 21, 2012

Child Trends has published a new research brief, Families and Child Outcomes: The Importance of Emotional Support for Mothers (March 2012), which finds that emotional support for mothers improves outcomes for children, even when controlling for family structure, income, gender, race/ethnicity, and child's age. Children whose mothers received emotional support were more likely to be engaged in school and exhibit social competence and less likely to display internalizing behaviors than children whose mothers did not receive emotional support.

3. The "Dual-Generation Strategy" Theory of Change

Source: Ray Marshall Center - Retrieved March 23, 2012

A recent brief published by the Ray Marshall Center describes the dual-generation strategy theory of change (2012), which suggests that the combination of three core components - high quality early-childhood education; job training for parents; and wrap-around family and peer support services - will lead to long-term academic and economic success for low-income families and their children. The goal of the Dual-Generation Strategy Initiative, which is sponsored by the Foundation for Child Development, is to promote the implementation of strategies at the state and federal level that move parents and children out of poverty together.

4. Grant Notice - Preparation of Special Education, Early Intervention, and Related Services Leadership Personnel

Source: U.S. Education Department - March 22, 2012

On March 22, 2012, the U.S. Education Department published the following notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2012: Personnel Development To Improve Services and Results for Children With Disabilities-Preparation of Special Education, Early Intervention, and Related Services Leadership Personnel (CFDA) Number: 84.325D. The Deadline for applications is May 7, 2012.