February 17, 2012

In this Issue:

  1. State Pre-K Assessment Policies: Issues and Status
      Source: Educational Testing Service - February 14, 2012
  2. Profiles of the 2011 Early Learning Challenge Grant Applications
      Source: Early Learning Challenge Collaborative - February 16, 2012
  3. Promote Access to Early, Regular and Comprehensive Screenings
      Source: CLASP - February 15, 2012
  4. New Video - Getting Kids Involved: Creating Opportunities for Learning
      Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - February 15, 2012
  5. When the Bough Breaks: The Effects of Homelessness on Young Children
      Source: Child Trends - February 16, 2012
  6. Infant Toddler Temperament Tool Available in Booklet Form and in Spanish
      Source: Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
  7. ZERO TO THREE Releases New State Baby Facts
      Source: ZERO TO THREE - February 6, 2012

1. State Pre-K Assessment Policies: Issues and Status

Source: Educational Testing Service - February 14, 2012

On February 14, 2012, the Educational Testing Service released a new report that looks at current approaches states are using to assess children enrolled in Pre-K programs, some of the challenges of assessing young children's learning, and suggested sound practices for states to consider implementing. State Pre-K Assessment Policies: Issues and Status (2012), by Debra Ackerman and Richard Coley, includes a summary chart of assessment practices used by the states on page 14. It is meant to help early childhood educators who wish to incorporate assessments into their programs as the need to document effectiveness increases.

2. Profiles of the 2011 Early Learning Challenge Grant Applications

Source: Early Learning Challenge Collaborative - February 16, 2012

The Early Learning Challenge Collaborative has published highlights and trends from a preliminary review of applications submitted by 37 states for the Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) grants in 2011. Stepping Up to the Challenge: Profiles of the 2011 Early Learning Challenge Grant Applications (2012) reviews progress that has been made and reforms that could be initiated based on the plans states included in their applications. A more in-depth analysis will be released in the coming months.

3. Promote Access to Early, Regular and Comprehensive Screenings

Source: CLASP - February 15, 2012

CLASP has released a new resource that highlights research supporting the importance of early and regular health, mental health, and developmental screening for infants and toddlers. It includes policy recommendations to help states improve their screening rates. Promote Access to Early, Regular and Comprehensive Screenings (February 2012) is part of the "Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care" project at CLASP.

4. New Video - Getting Kids Involved: Creating Opportunities for Learning

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - February 15, 2012

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has released a new video, Getting Kids Involved: Creating Opportunities for Learning (2012). The video introduces and illustrates many ways in which adaptations within the home or classroom can promote the active involvement of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with disabilities in everyday literacy activities.

CELL is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Research to Practice Division, and is a major initiative of the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute.

5. When the Bough Breaks: The Effects of Homelessness on Young Children

Source: Child Trends - February 16, 2012

Child Trends has published a new brief that looks at how homelessness impacts the development of young children. When the Bough Breaks: The Effects of Homelessness on Young Children (February 2012) reports that between 2006 and 2010, approximately 1.6 million children were homeless annually in the U.S. and about 40% of those children were under the age of six. The brief discusses research findings showing that preschoolers without a stable home are more likely to have a major developmental delay and higher rates of internalizing and externalizing behaviors than other children. It includes recommendations to help improve outcomes for these children, including access to high-quality child care and early education programs.

Another recently published Child Trends' brief, Frequent Residential Mobility and Young Children's Well-being (January 2012), looks at the demographic characteristics of young children identified as "frequent movers," and the association of frequent moves with their mental and physical health.

6. Infant Toddler Temperament Tool Available in Booklet Form and in Spanish

Source: Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation

The Infant Toddler Temperament Tool (IT3), developed for the Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation, is now available in the form of downloadable booklets and can also now be accessed in Spanish - Instrumento sobre el temperamento del bebé y del niño pequeño.

IT3 includes a short online survey that allows parents and caregivers of infants and toddlers to better understand their own temperament, the temperament of the children they care for, and how adult/child similarities or differences in temperament may affect "goodness of fit." The IT3 also provides tips to help adults foster the unique temperament of each child within their care.

7. ZERO TO THREE Releases New State Baby Facts

Source: ZERO TO THREE - February 6, 2012

ZERO TO THREE recently released a series of state factsheets presenting information about the status of infants, toddlers, and their families across the country. State Baby Facts (2012) are meant to help educate early childhood professionals and policymakers about programs that help improve the lives of infants, toddlers, and their families.

To accompany the fact sheets, ZERO TO THREE's new Baby Facts: Observations for States (2012) shares observations based on the factsheets about how infants and toddlers are faring across some of the states.