June 24, 2011

In this Issue:

  1. Special Journal Section on Social-Emotional Issues in Early Childhood Settings
      Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice - Retrieved June 23, 2011
  2. Poverty Fact Sheet: Implications for Infants and Toddlers
      Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - Retrieved June 21, 2011
  3. Federal Programs that Protect Young Children's Health
      Source: Children's HealthWatch - Retrieved June 21, 2011
  4. Study on How Home Learning Environments Impact School Readiness
      Source: ScienceDaily - Retrieved June 21, 2011
  5. Child Maltreatment 2009: Summary of Key Findings
      Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway - Retrieved June 24, 2011

1. Special Journal Section on Social-Emotional Issues in Early Childhood Settings

Source: Early Childhood Research & Practice - Retrieved June 23, 2011

The Spring 2011 issue of Early Childhood Research & Practice (ECRP) is now available online. It contains a special section on Social-Emotional Issues in Early Childhood Settings. See http://ecrp.uiuc.edu/v13n1/index.html. ECRP is a free online journal featuring articles related to the development, care, and education of children from birth to approximately age 8. It is published by the Clearinghouse on Early Education and Parenting (CEEP) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

2. Poverty Fact Sheet: Implications for Infants and Toddlers

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - Retrieved June 21, 2011

Poverty has been shown to compromise early child development, leading to both short- and long-term effects on health, school achievement, and later success in life. The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center has published a new fact that discusses what is actually meant by "poverty" and how it pertains to the healthy development of infants and toddlers. Poverty Fact Sheet: Implications for Infants and Toddlers (May 2011) is available online at http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/pdf/poverty-fact-sheet-5-10-11-final.pdf

3. Federal Programs that Protect Young Children's Health

Source: Children's HealthWatch - Retrieved June 21, 2011

Research has shown that children who suffer from poor nutrition, unstable housing and inadequate home heating are at risk for poor health and developmental delays. A new brief from Children's HealthWatch highlights a number of Federal programs that help protect the development of very young children, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP - formerly food stamps), WIC, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), and subsidized housing. All of these have all been shown to be effective in reducing the risks of poor child health and development. To learn more, go to http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org/upload/resource/fedprogs_brief_jun11.pdf

4. Study on How Home Learning Environments Impact School Readiness

Source: ScienceDaily - Retrieved June 21, 2011

The June 21, 2011 issue of ScienceDaily includes findings from a study that looked at the home environments of more than 1,850 children from households at or below the federal poverty line. Results showed that factors such as levels of shared reading, exposure to frequent and varied adult speech, and access to children's books had an impact on school readiness skills. For example, children whose learning environments were consistently low in quality from ages 1-5 were much more likely to have delays in language and literacy skills than children whose environments were uniformly high at these ages. These results highlight the importance of the first years of a child's life and how interventions can make a difference. To learn more, see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110620112108.htm

Journal Reference: Rodriguez, E. T., Tamis-LeMonda, C. S., (2011). Trajectories of the home learning environment across the first 5 years: Associations with children's vocabulary and literacy skills at prekindergarten. Child Development, Article first published online June 16, 2011, doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01614.x

5. Child Maltreatment 2009: Summary of Key Findings

Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway - Retrieved June 24, 2011

The Child Welfare Information Gateway has published a new factsheet summarizing information from Child Maltreatment 2009, the annual report of data collected from the States' child protective services (CPS) agencies via the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. The report showed that the youngest children continue to be the most vulnerable to maltreatment and children younger than 1 year have the highest rate of victimization. Child Maltreatment 2009: Summary of Key Findings (2011) is available online at http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/factsheets/canstats.cfm. The full report is available at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ cb/pubs/cm09/index.htm