June 17, 2011

In this Issue:

  1. Using Multiple Funding Streams to Serve Young Children
      Source: CLASP and the New America Foundation - Retrieved June 17, 2011
  2. Building Strong Systems of Support for Young Children's Mental Health
      Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved June 10, 2011
  3. New Policy Brief and Video on Early Language and Literacy Development
      Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - Retrieved June 17, 2011
  4. New CLASP Papers on Child Care and Early Head Start
      Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - Retrieved June 15, 2011
  5. Research Findings on the Child Care Choices of Low-Income Working Families
      Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved June 17, 2011
  6. Investing in Innovation (i3): Notices Inviting Applications for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011
      Source: U.S. Department of Education - Retrieved June 17, 2011

1. Using Multiple Funding Streams to Serve Young Children

Source: CLASP and the New America Foundation - Retrieved June 17, 2011

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently published a paper that examines one school district's use of funds from Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) to provide services for very young at-risk children. The author points out that Title I funds may be used for children beginning at birth and can be an important part of a comprehensive birth-five program in a community. Financing a Birth to Five Program: The Appleton Area School District Model (2011), by Hannah Matthews is available at http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/financingbirthtofive.pdf

On a related note, a new podcast from the New America Foundation's Early Education Initiative discusses blending and braiding funding streams to serve more children. The podcast features Pamela Harris, president & CEO of Mile High Montessori Early Learning Centers in Denver, CO. She discusses how blending and braiding funding streams enables the centers to provide high-quality early learning programs for children and families who might not otherwise have access to such programs. To listen to the podcast, go to http://earlyed.newamerica.net/blogposts/2011/blending_and_braiding_funding_streams_to_serve_more_children-52799

2. Building Strong Systems of Support for Young Children's Mental Health

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - Retrieved June 10, 2011

The National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) has published a new report that describes key strategies for creating a comprehensive system of supports for young children's mental health. It provides examples from states using these strategies and includes a tool that state planners can use to assess progress and plan steps toward building a strong system of early childhood mental health supports. Building Strong Systems of Support for Young Children's Mental Health: Key Strategies for States and a Planning Tool (June 2011), by Sheila Smith, Shannon Stagman, Susan Blank, Christine Ong, and Kendra McDow is available online at http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_1016.html

3. New Policy Brief and Video on Early Language and Literacy Development

Source: ZERO TO THREE Policy Center - Retrieved June 17, 2011

ZERO TO THREE's Policy Center recently announced the release of a new policy brief and video illustrating how early language and literacy development contributes to a child's success throughout life. The policy brief is available at http://www.zerotothree.org/public-policy/policy-toolkit/early-literacywebmarch1-6.pdf. The video can be viewed online at http://link.brightcove.com/services/player/bcpid4250110001?bctid=587336352001.

4. New CLASP Papers on Child Care and Early Head Start

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - Retrieved June 15, 2011

The Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) recently published the following papers related to child care and Early Head Start:

  • Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care: Expand Monitoring and Technical Assistance (2011), by Teresa Lim and Hannah Matthews - http://www.clasp.org/babiesinchildcare/recommendations?id=0009 - This paper recommends that states conduct routine monitoring of infant and toddler child care in centers and family child care settings at least twice a year, provide technical assistance to help providers with licensing compliance, and use information on provider compliance to inform parents and ensure ongoing improvements in monitoring systems and child care quality.
  • What State Leaders Should Know About Early Head Start (2011), by Elizabeth Hoffmann and Danielle Ewen - http://www.clasp.org/admin/site/publications/files/What-State-Leaders-Should-Know-About-EHS.pdf - This paper reviews 11 key aspects of how the Early Head Start (EHS) program works and provides considerations for state leaders. It is meant to serve as an introduction to the program for state policymakers, not to provide official guidance or interpretation of the laws and regulations governing EHS.

5. Research Findings on the Child Care Choices of Low-Income Working Families

Source: Urban Institute - Retrieved June 17, 2011

A recently published research report from the Urban Institute, Child Care Choices of Low-Income Working Families (June 2011), presents findings from a qualitative study of the child care choices of low-income working families with young children, many of whom were immigrants, English language learners, or parents of children with special needs. The authors discuss variations in family experiences, parental preferences, and factors that influenced their decisions. They conclude with policy recommendations to promote parental access to affordable and high quality care. The report is available at http://www.urban.org/publications/412343.html

6. Investing in Innovation (i3): Notices Inviting Applications for Fiscal Year (FY) 2011

Source: U.S. Department of Education - Retrieved June 17, 2011

Recently, the U.S. Department of Education announced that $150 million will be available for the next round of Investing in Innovation (i3) grants to support evidence-based practices in education. Individual school districts, groups of districts, and nonprofits in partnership with districts or a consortium of schools are invited to apply. Applicants may receive additional points if they successfully address certain priorities, including innovations for improving early learning outcomes and innovations to address the unique learning needs of students with disabilities and limited English proficient students.

The Department will be hosting three pre-application workshops and webinars to support potential applicants for these grants. Applications are due on August 2, 2011. Application packages and information on the pre-application workshops, can be found at http://www2.ed.gov/programs/innovation/index.html