January 28, 2011

In this Issue:

  1. Opportunities for Well-Coordinated Systems of Care for Young Children With Developmental Delay
      Source: The Urban Institute - January 24, 2011
  2. Self-Control in Early Childhood Can Lead to Better Health, Wealth, And Public Safety
      Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science - January 24, 2011
  3. Paying Later: The High Costs of Failing to Invest in Young Children
      Source: Partnerships for America's Economic Success - Retrieved January 28, 2011
  4. Video on Infants of Depressed Mothers Living in Poverty
      Source: The Urban Institute - January 21, 2011
  5. New Resources from the Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation
      Source: Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation - Retrieved January 28, 2011
  6. Podcast: Parents, Books and the Roots of Literacy
      Source: New America Foundation, Early Education Initiative - January 24, 2011
  7. Innovative Web Sites Provide Easy Access to Child Well-Being Data
      Source: Child Trends - January 27, 2011

1. Opportunities for Well-Coordinated Systems of Care for Young Children With Developmental Delay

Source: The Urban Institute - January 24, 2011

Early Intervention services supporting healthy development can reduce the incidence of disorders that have high costs and long-term consequences for children's health, education, and well-being. Unfortunately access to these services continues to be a challenge for many families. A new brief in the Urban Institute's "Improving the Lives of Young Children" series examines new opportunities that will soon be available under health reform and other federal legislation for states to develop well-coordinated systems of care for vulnerable young children. Opportunities for Care Coordination and Case Management for Children Receiving Services for Developmental Delay (January 2011), by Carrie Hanlon, is available online at http://www.urban.org/publications/412289.html

2. Self-Control in Early Childhood Can Lead to Better Health, Wealth, And Public Safety

Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Science - January 24, 2011

Findings from a study following 1,000 children from birth to age 32 show that children who displayed more self-control at age 3 had better health, less dependence on drugs or alcohol and higher annual incomes as adults than children with less self control. They were also less likely to be single parents or to have been convicted of a crime. This was true even after taking into account factors such as IQ and social class. In another cohort of 500 sibling pairs, the sibling with more self-control had better outcomes, despite a shared family background. These findings underscore the importance of addressing self-control issues in the earliest years. The article is freely available online through the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) open access option. Go to http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2011/01/20/1010076108.abstract

Citation: Moffitt, T. E., Arseneault, L., Belsky, D., Dickson, N., Hancox, R. J. , Harrington, H., ... Caspi, A. (2011). A gradient of childhood self-control predicts health, wealth, and public safety. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Published online before print January 24, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1010076108

3. Paying Later: The High Costs of Failing to Invest in Young Children

Source: Partnerships for America's Economic Success - Retrieved January 28, 2011

As states tackle difficult budget decisions, many children's programs are facing significant cuts. A new brief from the Partnerships for America's Economic Success, entitled Paying Later: The High Costs of Failing to Invest in Young Children (January 2011), discusses why such cuts result in much higher short- and long-term costs, due to an increased prevalence of child abuse and neglect, high school dropouts and criminal activity. It is available online at http://www.partnershipforsuccess.org/uploads/20110124_02311PAESCrimeBriefweb3.pdf

4. Video on Infants of Depressed Mothers Living in Poverty

Source: The Urban Institute - January 21, 2011

More than half of all infants living in poverty have a mother who is suffering from depression. In a new video, Urban Institute Fellow Olivia Golden discusses the dangers and developmental risks these infants face. Depression is treatable, but many poor mothers do not receive care, although opportunities do exist. Golden provides suggestions on how to identify depressed mothers and connect them to help and support. The video is available online at http://www.urban.org/publications/500205.html

5. New Resources from the Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation

Source: Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation - Retrieved January 28, 2011

The Center for Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation, funded by the Office of Head Start, recently published the following two new resources for parents, early childhood mental health consultants, and other early childhood staff:

  • My 1st Year is designed to document a baby's first year of life and can be used as a tool by both providers and parents.
  • Discovering Feelings offers caregivers an easy way to: (1) Introduce emotional vocabulary to a child; (2) Illustrate for children a range of emotions; (3) Validate the wide range of emotions experienced by children; and (4) Assist children in linking emotional vocabulary with specific actions.
Both are available online, along with tips for how to use them, at http://www.ecmhc.org/baby_books.html

6. Podcast: Parents, Books and the Roots of Literacy

Source: New America Foundation, Early Education Initiative - January 24, 2011

A new podcast from the New America Foundation's Early Education Initiative features Gabrielle Miller, a national expert on early literacy interventions. Miller has run several initiatives for Reading is Fundamental, developed programs for the Kennedy Krieger Institute and is presently the national executive director for Raising A Reader, a non-profit organization whose aim is to instill a love of reading among parents and children, especially those in poverty or otherwise disadvantaged. The talk focuses on research showing the importance of positive family involvement for a child's later reading success. It is available at http://earlyed.newamerica.net/blogposts/2011/podcast_parents_books_and_the_roots_of_literacy-43283

7. Innovative Web Sites Provide Easy Access to Child Well-Being Data

Source: Child Trends - January 27, 2011

The Winter 2011 issue of The Child Indicator, published by Child Trends, highlights several Web sites that display child well-being data in innovative ways. One of the featured items, for example, is the Illinois Early Childhood Asset Map, which displays the location of child care facilities, Head Start programs, and pre-K programs throughout the state. The Child Indicator also summarizes recent reports with new data on education, homelessness, health, and other indicators of child well-being. This issue is available online at http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Child_Trends-2011_01_27_CI_ChildIndWinter11.pdf