September 2, 2010

In this Issue:

  1. Infants of Depressed Mothers Living in Poverty: Opportunities to Identify and Serve
      Source: Urban Institute - August 25, 2010
  2. Early Education Programs and Children of Immigrants: Learning Each Other's Language
      Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - August 31, 2010
  3. Early Literacy Practice Guides for Parents Now Available in Spanish
      Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - September 1, 2010
  4. DEC's Comments on the Reauthorization of ESEA
      Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood - August 10, 2010
  5. Radio Segment Discusses Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Very Young Children
      Source: BAM Radio - Retrieved September 2, 2010
  6. New Fact Sheets from the National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative
      Source: National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative - Retrieved September 2, 2010
  7. New WWC Early Childhood Education Report: Ladders to Literacy
      Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - August 31, 2010
  8. Q & A on the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS)
      Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - Retrieved September 2, 2010

1. Infants of Depressed Mothers Living in Poverty: Opportunities to Identify and Serve

Source: Urban Institute - August 25, 2010

A new report from the Urban Institute shows that eleven percent of infants living in poverty have a mother suffering from severe depression. Many of these families are connected to services, such as WIC, health care, food stamps and TANF, presenting opportunities for policymakers and service providers to intervene. The brief includes strategies to help connect depressed mothers with treatment. Infants of Depressed Mothers Living in Poverty: Opportunities to Identify and Serve (2010), by Tracy Vericker, Jennifer Ehrle Macomber, Olivia Golden is available online at http://www.urban.org/publications/412199.html

2. Early Education Programs and Children of Immigrants: Learning Each Other's Language

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - August 31, 2010

Many immigrant families encounter barriers to accessing high-quality child care and early education programs for their young children. A new paper from the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) discusses state and local strategies for improving access for immigrant families. It was written for the Urban Institute's roundtable on Young Children in Immigrant Families and the Path to Educational Success. Early Education Programs and Children of Immigrants: Learning Each Other's Language (2010), by Hannah Matthews and Danielle Ewen is available online at http://www.urban.org/publications/412205.html

3. Early Literacy Practice Guides for Parents Now Available in Spanish

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - September 1, 2010

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) has translated 18 practice guides for parents into Spanish. These guides provide parents who prefer to read in Spanish with practices they can use to engage their children in everyday early literacy learning activities. They are written at a 5th to 6th grade level. To access the guides, go to http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/pgparents_span.php

CELL also recently published an Overview Video that provides an introduction and illustration of the four components of the CELL model. It can be accessed on the CELL home page at http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org. CELL is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, Research to Practice Division and is a major initiative of the Center for Evidence-Based Practices at the Orelena Hawks Puckett Institute.

4. DEC's Comments on the Reauthorization of ESEA

Source: Council for Exceptional Children, Division for Early Childhood - August 10, 2010

The Council for Exceptional Children's Division for Early Childhood (DEC) was recently invited to meet with Jacqueline Jones, Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Early Learning at the U.S. Department of Education, to discuss reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and other early childhood initiatives. To read a copy of DEC's comments, go to http://www.dec-sped.org/uploads/docs/What%27s%20New/FinalDECESEAComments08_10_10.pdf

5. Radio Segment Discusses Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in Very Young Children

Source: BAM Radio - Retrieved September 2, 2010

BAM Radio, an education radio network providing programs from the nation's top education organizations and thought leaders, recently featured a discussion on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in very young children. In the segment, experts Dr. Patricia Van Horn, Susan J. Grosse and Susan Sawyers provide information on how to identify possible PTSD in young children and guidance on what to do if a child is thought to be affected. It can be accessed at http://www.jackstreet.com/jackstreet/WMBK.RTPTSD.cfm

6. New Fact Sheets from the National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative

Source: National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative - Retrieved September 2, 2010

The National Infant & Toddler Child Care Initiative (NITCCI) has published several new fact sheets, including:

7. New WWC Early Childhood Education Report: Ladders to Literacy

Source: What Works Clearinghouse, Institute of Education Sciences - August 31, 2010

On August 31, 2010, the What Works Clearinghouse (WWC) released a new early childhood education report that rates the research on Ladders to Literacy, a supplemental early literacy curriculum designed to develop children's print/book awareness, metalinguistic awareness, and oral language skills. It is available online at http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/reports/early_ed/ladders/index.asp

8. Q & A on the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS)

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services - Retrieved September 2, 2010

In August 2010, the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) released a revised Q & A document on the National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard (NIMAS). All States must adopt NIMAS, which was established pursuant to sections 612(a)(23)(A) and 674(e)(4) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). NIMAS guides the production and electronic distribution of flexible digital instructional materials, so that they can be more easily converted to Braille, text-to-speech and other accessible formats. The Q & A is available at http://idea.ed.gov/explore/view/p/%2Croot%2Cdynamic%2CQaCorner%2C5%2C