June 11, 2010

In this Issue:

  1. Supporting the Social-Emotional Wellbeing of Children in Part C Early Intervention Programs
      Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - June 11, 2010
  2. Funding Opportunity for the New Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - June 10, 2010
  3. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Improving the Lives of Children and Their Families
      Source: Society for Research in Child Development - Retrieved June 10, 2010
  4. Recession and Drop in Pre-K Enrollment Could Impact Long-Term Educational Outcomes
      Source: Foundation for Child Development - June 8, 2010
  5. Study Links Regular Bedtimes to Better Language, Reading and Math Skills in Preschool Children
      Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine - June 7, 2010
  6. Home-School Differences: What it Means for Kindergarten Readiness
      Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved June 11, 2010
  7. New Report Compares Child Care Quality Rating Systems
      Source: Child Trends - Retrieved June 11, 2010

1. Supporting the Social-Emotional Wellbeing of Children in Part C Early Intervention Programs

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - June 11, 2010

A new brief from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP) discusses exemplary policies and practices that highlight the potential of the Part C Early Intervention Program to play a major role in reducing the risk of long-term social-emotional and behavioral difficulties of vulnerable children. Promoting the Social-emotional Wellbeing of Infants and Toddlers in Early Intervention Programs: Promising Strategies in Four Communities (June 2010), by Taniesha A. Woods, Sheila Smith, and Janice L. Cooper is available online at http://nccp.org/publications/pub_946.html

2. Funding Opportunity for the New Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - June 10, 2010

The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and the Administration on Children and Families (ACF) have announced the first Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for the new Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, created as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. Approximately $90 million will be awarded this summer to fund the new grant program for eligible States and territories to provide evidence-based home visiting programs for children and families in at risk communities. The application deadline is July 09, 2010.

See the announcement at http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/fh/mch/fhv/fedmiec.html
See also, http://www.nectac.org/~docs/eNotes/FOA1_ Home_visiting.doc

3. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Improving the Lives of Children and Their Families

Source: Society for Research in Child Development - Retrieved June 10, 2010

A new Social Policy Report Brief from the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) provides highlights from recent studies on Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and strategies for developing social policies to help improve outcomes for children and adults with ASDs. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Improving the Lives of Children and Their Families (Social Policy Report Brief, v.24, n.2, 2010) is available online at http://www.srcd.org/index.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_download&gid=931

This brief summarizes a longer Social Policy Report by Catherine Lord and Somer L. Bishop, entitled Autism Spectrum Disorders: Diagnosis, Prevalence, and Services for Children and Families (2010) - http://www.srcd.org/index.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_download&gid=930

4. Recession and Drop in Pre-K Enrollment Could Impact Long-Term Educational Outcomes

Source: Foundation for Child Development - June 8, 2010

The Foundation for Child Development has published the 2010 Child Well-Being Index, which provides comprehensive data on the impact of the recession on American children's quality-of-life. According to the report, the number of children living in poverty will rise to 15.6 million in 2010, an increase of more than 3 million children in four years. In the press release, Ruby Takanishi, president of the Foundation for Child Development, mentions a drop in pre-kindergarten enrollment as being of particular concern, because it could impact the educational outcomes of children for years to come.

To access the report, go to http://www.fcd-us.org/resources/2010-child-well-being-index-cwi?doc_id=1266393.
See also, the Hechinger Report's discussion on this issue - http://hechingerreport.org/content/tough-times-ahead-for-children-of-the-great-recession-report-finds_2997/

5. Study Links Regular Bedtimes to Better Language, Reading and Math Skills in Preschool Children

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine - June 7, 2010

On June 7, 2010, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine released findings from a study showing that preschoolers who get adequate sleep score higher on a range of developmental assessments. The findings suggested that among sleep habits, having a regular bedtime was the most consis­tent predictor of positive developmental outcomes at 4 years of age. The group recommends that preschoolers should sleep at least 11 hours a night. To learn more, see the press release at http://www.aasmnet.org/Articles.aspx?id=1707

6. Home-School Differences: What it Means for Kindergarten Readiness

Source: National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education - Retrieved June 11, 2010

The National Center for Research on Early Childhood Education (NCRECE) has published a new short brief, entitled Home-School Differences: What it Means for Kindergarten Readiness (NCRECE In Focus, v.1, no.4, May 2010), which summarizes the findings from a study that looked at how differences between home and school environments impact children's school readiness. The results raise questions about the commonly held assumption that similarity of beliefs and practices between homes and schools lead to better outcomes for children. To read the brief, go to http://www.ncrece.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ncreceinfocus-v1-i4-home-school-differences.pdf. It is based on the following article:

7. New Report Compares Child Care Quality Rating Systems

Source: Child Trends - Retrieved June 11, 2010

A number of states are developing Quality Rating Systems to assess and improve the quality of early care and education programs for young children. The Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recently commissioned a new compendium profiling 26 child care Quality Rating Systems. The compendium was written by researchers from Child Trends and Mathematica Policy Research. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment: Compendium of Quality Rating Systems and Evaluations (2010) can be accessed online at http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/research/project/quality-rating-systems-qrs-assessment-project-2008-2011y/