January 29, 2010

In this Issue:

  1. Second Quarter 2009 Letters of Clarification from the Office of Special Education Programs
      Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - January 29, 2010
  2. Interactive Web Feature Explains the Science of Early Child Development
      Source: Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University - Retrieved January 29, 2010
  3. Announcing New SpecialQuest Preschool Inclusion Series
      Source: SpecialQuest Birth-Five: Head Start/Hilton Foundation Training Program - January 25, 2010
  4. The Costs of Disinvestment: Why States Can't Afford to Cut Smart Early Childhood Programs
      Source: Partnership for America's Economic Success - January 19, 2010
  5. Implementing Developmental Screening and Referrals: Lessons Learned From a National Project
      Source: Pediatrics - January 25, 2010

1. Second Quarter 2009 Letters of Clarification from the Office of Special Education Programs

Source: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs - January 29, 2010

Policy letters related to the education of infants, toddlers, children, and youth with disabilities from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) dated April 1, 2009 through June 30, 2009 are now available online at http://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/letters/2009-2/index.html. On January 21, 2010, the Federal Register published a list of these letters with summaries included. See http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2010/2010-1082.htm

A subset of OSEP policy letters that specifically address Part C and Section 619 of the IDEA can be accessed via the NECTAC Web site at http://www.nectac.org/idea/clarfctnltrs.asp

2. Interactive Web Feature Explains the Science of Early Child Development

Source: Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University - Retrieved January 29, 2010

The Center for the Developing Child at Harvard University recently added a new interactive feature to their Web site that explains core concepts in the science of early childhood development through images and text. It discusses how brains are built over time; the interaction of genes and experience; the damage caused by chronic, unrelenting adversity ("toxic stress"); and why early intervention matters to all of us. It is available at http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/multimedia/interactive_features/coreconcepts/

3. Announcing New SpecialQuest Preschool Inclusion Series

Source: SpecialQuest Birth-Five: Head Start/Hilton Foundation Training Program - January 25, 2010

SpecialQuest Birth-Five announces the availability of new materials supporting high quality inclusion of preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) in early care and education settings. The new Preschool Inclusion Series highlights children with disabilities participating in inclusive environments. Classroom staff, administrators, specialists, and families share their perspectives on what makes inclusion work. The target audiences are early childhood professional development providers, faculty from colleges and universities, family leaders, and policy makers.

The new series contains four video programs (English, English open-captioned, Spanish open-captioned) with training scripts and handouts (English and Spanish). To download the materials or to order an individual set on DVD/CD, go to http://76.249.171.46/specialquest/trainingmaterials/

For questions, please contact Sandy Tradewell, Systems Coordinator, SpecialQuest Birth-Five, at sandy.tradewell@specialquest.org or 707.849.4290. Join the SpecialQuest Community by subscribing to the SpecialQuest e-newsletter at http://www.specialquest.org

4. The Costs of Disinvestment: Why States Can't Afford to Cut Smart Early Childhood Programs

Source: Partnership for America's Economic Success - January 19, 2010

The Partnership for America's Economic Success has issued a new issue brief entitled The Costs of Disinvestment: Why States Can't Afford to Cut Smart Early Childhood Programs (January 2010), which argues that states can save money and stimulate their economies by protecting funding for effective pre-kindergarten and home visiting programs. The brief presents evidence showing that investing in early childhood programs is fundamental to achieving a globally competitive workforce and fiscal sustainability for states and the nation. It is available online at http://www.pewtrusts.org/our_work_report_detail.aspx?id=56874&category=10

5. Implementing Developmental Screening and Referrals: Lessons Learned From a National Project

Source: Pediatrics - January 25, 2010

In 2006, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released a policy statement on developmental surveillance and screening that included an algorithm to help pediatric practices implement the new recommendations. Recent findings from a pilot project show that although doctors screened more children for developmental delays after the policy statement was issued, they did not consistently refer children suspected of having delays to early intervention programs and had difficulty tracking the referrals they did make. Additionally, many families did not follow through with recommended referrals. To learn more, go to http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/peds.2009-0388v1

Citation: King, Tracy M., Tandon, S. Darius, Macias, Michelle M., Healy, Jill A., Duncan, Paula M., Swigonski, Nancy L., Skipper, Stephanie M., & Lipkin, Paul H. (2010). Implementing Developmental Screening and Referrals: Lessons Learned From a National Project. Pediatrics, Published online January 25, 2010. (doi:10.1542/peds.2009-0388)