October 3, 2008

In this Issue:

  1. Promoting the Healthy Growth and Development of Infants and Toddlers in Child Care Settings
      Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - September 30, 2008
  2. A Study of Classroom Literacy Interventions and Outcomes in Even Start
      Source: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences - September 30, 2008
  3. Society for Research in Child Development Fellowships in Public Policy
      Source: Society for Research in Child Development - Retrieved October 2, 2008
  4. New Report on 2008 State Child Care Assistance Policies
      Source: National Women's Law Center - Retrieved October 1, 2008
  5. The Well-Being of Children in Working Poor and Other Families: 1997 and 2004
      Source: Child Trends - September 30, 2008

1. Promoting the Healthy Growth and Development of Infants and Toddlers in Child Care Settings

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - September 30, 2008

The Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project at the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) has published three new research-based rationales, which provide recommendations for states on how to promote the healthy growth and development of infants and toddlers in child care settings:

To learn more about the Charting Progress for Babies in Child Care project go to http://www.clasp.org/projects

2. A Study of Classroom Literacy Interventions and Outcomes in Even Start

Source: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences - September 30, 2008

The National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEE) at the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) has published a new report entitled A Study of Classroom Literacy Interventions and Outcomes in Even Start. This report presents findings from a 2-year implementation of research-based, literacy-focused preschool and parenting education curricula in 120 Even Start Family Literacy projects. It is available online at http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20084028.asp

3. Society for Research in Child Development Fellowships in Public Policy

Source: Society for Research in Child Development - Retrieved October 2, 2008

The Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) is now accepting applications for the 2009-2010 Policy Fellowships. These Fellowships provide opportunities for researchers to use developmental science to inform public policy at both the Congressional and Executive level. Early and mid-career doctoral professionals of all scientific disciplines relevant to child development are encouraged to apply. For more information and application instructions go to http://www.srcd.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=181&Itemid=306

4. New Report on 2008 State Child Care Assistance Policies

Source: National Women's Law Center - Retrieved October 1, 2008

The National Women's Law Center has published a nationwide analysis comparing child care assistance policies in 2008 to 2007 and 2001 in four areas: income eligibility, waiting lists for assistance, copayment requirements and reimbursement rates for providers. State Child Care Assistance Policies 2008: Too Little Progress for Children and Families shows that while some states have made progress since 2007, most are behind where they were in 2001. The report also shows that despite modest gains in some areas, the states fall short in providing low-income parents the support they need to obtain good-quality child care. It is available online at http://www.nwlc.org/details.cfm?id=3355&section=childcare

5. The Well-Being of Children in Working Poor and Other Families: 1997 and 2004

Source: Child Trends - September 30, 2008

When the welfare system was reformed in 1996, there was concern that increased work efforts by single mothers might lead to deterioration in child outcomes, because mothers would have less time to spend with their children. However, a new Child Trends analysis, entitled The Well-Being of Children in Working Poor and Other Families: 1997 and 2004, finds better child outcomes in working poor families than in non-working poor families. The research brief is available at http://www.childtrends.org/Files//Child_Trends-2008_09_29_RB_WorkingPoor.pdf