November 21, 2007

In this Issue:

  1. New TRACE Practice Guide - Universal Checklist for Identifying Infants and Toddlers Eligible for Early Intervention
      Source: Tracking, Referral and Assessment Center for Excellence - November 20, 2007
  2. Who are America's Poor Children? The Official Story
      Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - November 21, 2007
  3. New Research Findings - Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Characterized by a Delay in Cortical Maturation
      Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 12, 2007

1. New TRACE Practice Guide - Universal Checklist for Identifying Infants and Toddlers Eligible for Early Intervention

Source: Tracking, Referral and Assessment Center for Excellence - November 20, 2007

The Tracking, Referral and Assessment Center for Excellence (TRACE) has released a new practice guide entitled Universal Checklist for Identifying Infants and Toddlers Eligible for Early Intervention by Carl J. Dunst, Carol M. Trivette, & Glinda Hill. The guide describes the development and use of a universal checklist designed to be used by primary referral sources for identifying infants and toddlers who may be eligible for early intervention. For more information and to access the practice guide go to http://www.tracecenter.info/practiceguides/practiceguides_vol2_no1.pdf

2. Who are America's Poor Children? The Official Story

Source: National Center for Children in Poverty - November 21, 2007

A new report from the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP), entitled Who are America's Poor Children? The Official Story by Sarah Fass and Nancy K. Cauthen, states that close to 13 million children in the U.S. live in families with incomes below the federal poverty level, which is $20,650 a year for a family of four. There are 1.2 million more children living in poverty today than in 2000, an increase of 11 percent. Black, Latino, and American Indian children are disproportionately poor, while white children comprise the largest group of poor children. 20% of children under age 6 live in poor families. To read the full report go to http://www.nccp.org/publications/pub_787.html

3. New Research Findings - Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Characterized by a Delay in Cortical Maturation

Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 12, 2007

Findings from a recent study by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) showed that in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the brain matures in a normal pattern but is delayed an average of 3 years and as many as 5 years in some regions, compared to children without the disorder. The delay was most prominent in areas of the frontal cortex that support the ability to suppress inappropriate actions and thoughts, focus attention, remember things from moment to moment, work for reward, and control movement. "Finding a normal pattern of cortex maturation, albeit delayed, in children with ADHD should be reassuring to families and could help to explain why many youth eventually seem to grow out of the disorder," explained Philip Shaw, M.D., NIMH Child Psychiatry Branch, who led research team. To read the full press release go to http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/nov2007/nimh-12.htm.

Citation information: Shaw, P., Eckstrand, K., Sharp, W., Blumenthal, J., et al. (2007). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is characterized by a delay in cortical maturation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Published online before print November 16, 2007, at http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0707741104v1