February 16, 2007

In this Issue:

  1. New from the Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL)
      Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - February 12, 2007
  2. New Papers from the Brookings Institute on Early Childhood Education
      Source: Brookings Institute - February 13, 2007
  3. NAEYC's Recommendations to the 110th U.S. Congress
      Source: NAEYC - Retrieved February 15, 2007
  4. CDC Releases New Data on Autism Spectrum Disorders
      Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 8, 2007
  5. Study Examines the Feasibility of Expanding Mental Health Services for Young Children
      Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Retrieved February 12, 2007

1. New from the Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL)

Source: Center for Early Literacy Learning - February 12, 2007

The Center for Early Literacy Learning (CELL) recently published the following two new papers online:

  • Framework for Developing Evidence-Based Early Literacy Learning Practices
    http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpapers/cellpapers_v1_n1.pdf
    This article describes a research-to-practice framework for organizing available research evidence and using this evidence to develop literacy learning practice guides and tool kits. The framework described is being used at the Center for Early Literacy Learning for culling research evidence to identify the characteristics of early literacy learning experiences associated with later literacy success.
  • Scaling-Up Early Childhood Intervention Literacy Learning Practices http://www.earlyliteracylearning.org/cellpapers/cellpapers_v1_n2.pdf
    This article describes key considerations for scaling up the use of early literacy learning practices with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with developmental disabilities and delays by early childhood intervention programs and practitioners.

2. New Papers from the Brookings Institute on Early Childhood Education

Source: Brookings Institute - February 13, 2007

The following two new papers related to early childhood education are now available on the Brookings Institute Web site:

  • Cost-Effective Investments in Children
    http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2007/01childrenfamilies_isaacs.aspx
    This paper proposes four areas of investment to benefit America's future economic well-being, including: (1) High-quality early childhood education programs for three- and four-year-old children ($94 billion over five years); (2) Nurse home-visiting programs to promote sound prenatal care and the healthy development of infants and toddlers ($14 billion over five years); (3) School reform emphasizing programs in high-poverty elementary schools that improve the acquisition of basic skills for all students ($17 billion over five years): and (4) Programs that reduce the incidence of teenage pregnancy ($8 billion over five years).
  • Success By Ten: Intervening Early, Often, and Effectively in the Education of Young Children
    http://www.brookings.edu/papers/2007/02education_ludwig.aspx
    This paper discusses a proposed program designed to help every child achieve success in school by age ten. It recommends a major expansion and intensification of Head Start and Early Head Start, so that all disadvantaged young children have the opportunity to enroll in high-quality programs of education and care. And because the benefits of intensive early intervention may be lost if children go from these programs to low-quality elementary schools, it also recommends that schools devote their Title I spending to instructional programs that have proven effective in further improving the skills of children, especially their ability to read.

3. NAEYC's Recommendations to the 110th U.S. Congress

Source: NAEYC - Retrieved February 15, 2007

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) recently published its Recommendations to the 110th U.S. Congress online at http://www.naeyc.org/policy/federal/pdf/CALLtoACTION107Combo.pdf

4. CDC Releases New Data on Autism Spectrum Disorders

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - February 8, 2007

On February 8, 2007 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported findings from the first and largest summary of prevalence data from multiple U.S. communities participating in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) surveillance project. The results showed an average of 6.7 children out of 1,000 had an ASD in the six communities assessed in 2000, and an average of 6.6 children out of 1,000 had an ASD in the 14 communities included in the 2002 study. This equals approximately 1 in 150 children in these communities. For more information go to http://www.cdc.gov/od/oc/media/pressrel/2007/f070208.htm

5. Study Examines the Feasibility of Expanding Mental Health Services for Young Children

Source: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Retrieved February 12, 2007

The findings of a study published in the February 2007 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry concludes that training mental health staff to provide treatment to infants and preschool children and families in public mental health settings is feasible and leads to an increase in numbers of children served. An abstract of the article is available at http://journals.lww.com/jaacap/pages/articleviewer.aspx?year=2007&issue=02000&article=00003&type=abstract

The full citation for the article is:
Knapp PK, Ammen S, Arstein-Kerslake C, et al. 2007. Feasibility of expanding services for very young children in the public mental health setting. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 46(2):152-161.