September 29, 2006

In this Issue:

  1. New Grant Opportunities from the U.S. Department of Education
      Source: Federal Register - September 26, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 186)
  2. Interviews with Two Members of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child
      Source: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child - Retrieved September 29, 2006
  3. Children's Environmental Health: 2006 Report
      Source: Environmental Protection Agency - Retrieved September 29, 2006
  4. Report on the Teacher Needs Survey from the American Psychological Association
      Source: APA - Retrieved September 29, 2006

1. New Grant Opportunities from the U.S. Department of Education

Source: Federal Register - September 26, 2006 (Volume 71, Number 186)

The following new grant opportunities from the U.S. Department of Education were recently announced in the Federal Register:

  • Parent Training and Information Centers (CFDA# 84.328M) - The purpose of this program is to ensure that parents of children with disabilities receive training and information to help improve results for their children.
    Applications Available: September 26, 2006.
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: November 13, 2006.
    For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-3/092606g.html
  • Research on Technology Effectiveness and Implementation for Children With Disabilities: Web-Supported Instructional Approaches (CFDA# 84.327W) - The purpose of this program is to: (1) Improve results for children with disabilities by promoting the development, demonstration, and use of technology; (2) support educational media services activities designed to be of educational value in the classroom setting to children with disabilities; and (3) provide support for captioning and video description that is appropriate for use in the classroom setting.
    Applications Available: September 26, 2006.
    Deadline for Transmittal of Applications: November 13, 2006.
    For complete information go to http://www2.ed.gov/legislation/FedRegister/announcements/2006-3/092606f.html

2. Interviews with Two Members of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child

Source: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child - Retrieved September 29, 2006

The following two interviews with members of the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child are now available online at http://www.developingchild.net/:

  • Deprivation and Disruption: An Interview with Charles A. Nelson
    Charles A. Nelson, Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, Professor of Education and Neuroscience at Harvard University, and the Richard David Scott Professor of Pediatric Developmental Research at Children's Hospital Boston, discusses how early deprivation causes serious disruption in the development of brain architecture and in the behaviors related to the affected brain functions. Some brain structures, and the broad categories of development that depend on them, show more "plasticity," or sensitivity to disruption and intervention for longer periods of time, than others. When problems arise, early intervention can help get development back on track. Professor Nelson's research, including his work in Romanian orphanages, demonstrates how new scientific knowledge can lead to better public policy.
  • Early Influences on Brain Architecture: An Interview with Eric Knudsen
    Eric Knudsen, the Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor of Neurobiology at Stanford University, discusses how early experience has a powerful and lasting influence on how the brain develops. The physical and chemical conditions that encourage the building of a strong, adaptive brain architecture are present early in life. As brains age, a number of changes lock in the ways information is processed, making it more difficult for the brain to change to other ways of dealing with information. Maintaining plasticity - keeping the brain open to change - takes energy, and this energy is finite. The right kinds of early experiences make the best use of this energy for the benefit of both individuals and society.

3. Children's Environmental Health: 2006 Report

Source: Environmental Protection Agency - Retrieved September 29, 2006

In order to learn, children must have safe and healthy schools and they must be able to concentrate, free from environmentally-related conditions that may precede illness. Asthma, lead poisoning, inadequate ventilation, moisture and mold problems, improper use of pesticides, and inadequate chemical management are all environmental issues in schools. This annual publication from the EPA highlights a variety of efforts to improve the environments where children live, learn and play. It discusses recent projects to improve school environments, address indoor and outdoor air quality, and reduce exposures to chemicals and pesticides. It also highlights research, regulatory, and data development work. Available online at http://yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/content/CEH06_Final.htm/$file/CEH06_Final.pdf

4. Report on the Teacher Needs Survey from the American Psychological Association

Source: APA - Retrieved September 29, 2006

A recent Teacher Needs Survey administered by the American Psychological Association (APA) received 2334 responses from Pre-K through 12th-grade teachers in 49 States. The respondents indicated that teachers want help with classroom management in areas such as children's safety and dealing with disruptive behaviors. Teachers also want help with promoting critical thinking and motivating children to learn. New teachers, in particular, expressed a strong need for assistance. Respondents also indicated a preference for receiving professional development in the form of in-district workshops with teams of teachers or on-line modules, rather than larger regional workshops. To read the full report go to http://www.apa.org/ed/cpse/tns_execsummary.pdf