November 18, 2005

In this Issue:

  1. Build Initiative to Add New States
      Source: The Build Initiative - November 18, 2005
  2. MIT Scientists Study Genetic Factors in Autism
      Source: MIT Technology Review - November 14, 2005
  3. In Harm's Way: Aiding Children Exposed to Trauma
      Source: Grantmakers in Health - Retrieved November 18, 2005

1. Build Initiative to Add New States

Source: The Build Initiative - November 18, 2005

The Build Initiative currently supports five grantee states and four learning partner states in building a coordinated system of programs, policies, and services for children from birth through age five. In 2006, Build will work solely in states where there is a commitment of funding from private foundations and/or other funding entities within the state to support the early learning system building work. Build is seeking to add two or three states that have funding partner(s) to support their involvement by the end of the first quarter of 2006. States should indicate their interest by December 9, and a rolling review process will be conducted through the first quarter of 2006. To read more go to http://www.buildinitiative.org/content/state-partners

2. MIT Scientists Study Genetic Factors in Autism

Source: MIT Technology Review - November 14, 2005

With the aid of a $7.5 million grant from the Simons Foundation, MIT researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology will combine imaging and genetic tools to better understand how genes contribute to the social and behavioral problems that characterize autism. To read an article about the research project go to http://technologyreview.com/BioTech-Genomics/wtr_15875,312,p1.html.

3. In Harm's Way: Aiding Children Exposed to Trauma

Source: Grantmakers in Health - Retrieved November 18, 2005

Trauma can have profound and lasting effects on brain development and the physical and emotional health of children. A new issue brief produced by Grantmakers in Health, In Harm's Way: Aiding Children Exposed to Trauma, examines the extent to which children are exposed to trauma; the effects of this exposure; and proven and promising approaches for identifying and serving traumatized children. It is intended to highlight the work of grantmakers and others working to meet the mental health needs of children and ameliorate the effects of childhood trauma.

The full brief is available at http://www.gih.org/usr_doc/GIH_IssueBrief23pdf.pdf.
An executive summary is available at http://www.gih.org/usr_doc/Exec_Summaery.pdf