November 12, 2002

In this Issue:

  1. Statement by the President on Signing of the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002
      Source: www.ed.gov/PressReleases - November 6, 2002
  2. Taking Steps to Protect Research Participants
      Source: bulletin@sedl.org - November 7, 2002
  3. No Child Left Behind: A Desktop Reference
      Source: www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/ - November 2002
  4. Early Childhood Educator Academies
      Source: www.ed.gov - November 2002
  5. Research, Policy, and Innovations for Strengthening Childhood Development Services
      Source: MCH Alert - November 8, 2002
  6. Training for Early Childhood Educators in High-Need Communities
      Source: ED News: No Child Left Behind - October 23 - November 7, 2002

1. Statement by the President on Signing of the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002

Source: www.ed.gov/PressReleases - November 6, 2002

To read a statement made by the president on his signing of the Education Sciences Reform Act of 2002, go to http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2002/11/11062002b.html

2. Taking Steps to Protect Research Participants

Source: bulletin@sedl.org - November 7, 2002

The Southwest Educational Development Laboratory's National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research (NCDDR) has recently published Focus Technical Brief No. 1: Taking Steps to Protect Research Participants. This document presents four steps for responding to Federal requirements for protecting human participants (human subjects) in research activities, including participants with disabilities.  Resources are identified. The full text or the report is available at: http://www.ncddr.org/kt/products/focus/focus1/

3. No Child Left Behind: A Desktop Reference

Source: www.ed.gov/offices/OESE/ - November 2002

The No Child Left Behind Desktop Reference (http://www2.ed.gov/admins/lead/account/nclbreference/page.html) outlines what is new under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 for each program supported under the Elementary and Secondary Act of 1965 and other statues. It also describes how the Act's four guiding principles (accountability, flexibility and local control, parental choice, and what works) are brought to bear on many of these programs. The intent is to provide a substantive overview of policy changes and emphases for state and district officials. Programs for which no funding was requested in fiscal years 2002 and 2003 are not included.

4. Early Childhood Educator Academies

Source: www.ed.gov - November 2002

In April of this year President Bush announced his proposals to strengthen early childhood education in his policy document, Good Start, Grow Smart. One of the goals put forth by the President was to encourage States to set quality criteria for early childhood education.  In the upcoming months, the U.S. Department of Education will host four regional Early Childhood Educator Academies to share research on early childhood instructional practices and professional development that promote cognitive development. The Academies will also provide guidance on developing or strengthening early childhood voluntary guidelines.

November 14-15 -  Los Angeles, CA
December 3-4 -  St. Louis, MO
December 9-10 - Miami, FL
April 7-8 - Lowell, MA

For more information please go to: http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OESE/earlychildhood/eceacademy.html

5. Research, Policy, and Innovations for Strengthening Childhood Development Services

Source: MCH Alert - November 8, 2002

Reasons and Strategies for Strengthening Childhood Development Services in the Healthcare System presents concrete steps that states can take to help strengthen child development services, highlighting innovative practices in Arizona, California, Kentucky, Maine, North Carolina, and Washington. This issue brief, published by the National Academy for State Health
Policy with funding from the Commonwealth Fund, is based on research, key national policy reports, and state and local innovations. The report includes information on preventive child development services; challenges to integrating child development services into the health care system; strategies for improving child development services in the health care system; and promising practices at the state, community, and primary care levels. The appendix includes an overview of developmental screening tools. The report, intended for use by state health agency administrators, health professionals, and others interested in improving early childhood development services, policies, and practices, is available at  http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Content/Publications/Fund-Reports/2002/Oct/Reasons-and-Strategies-for-Strengthening-Childhood-Development-Services-in-the-Healthcare-System.aspx.

VanLandeghem K., Curtis D., & Abrams M. 2002. Reasons and strategies for strengthening childhood development services in the healthcare system. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy.

[Originally published in MCHAlert ©  2002 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University.  Reprinted with permission.]

6. Training for Early Childhood Educators in High-Need Communities

Source: ED News: No Child Left Behind - October 23 - November 7, 2002

Building on Laura Bush's nationwide efforts to highlight the importance of early childhood cognitive development, U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige has announced grants totaling $14.6 million to improve the knowledge and skills of early childhood educators in communities with high concentrations of poverty. Last year, Mrs. Bush held the first White House Summit on Early Childhood Development during which she challenged education leaders to focus on the critical cognitive development stages of children from birth through age five.

"The years from the crib to the classroom represent a period of intense language and cognitive growth," offered Mrs. Bush at the White House Summit. "We all have the duty to call attention to the science and seriousness of early childhood cognitive development." The funded projects are built upon scientific research on early childhood teaching and child development and learning. Teachers who work in preschools located in high-need communities and who serve children from low-income families will participate in professional development activities to improve children's language and cognitive skills and to prevent reading and behavior problems as children enter and move through school.

Nine projects in California, Florida, Kansas, Mississippi, New York, Oregon, Tennessee and Texas received the U.S. Department of Education (ED) funding. For more information go to: http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2002/11/11042002.html