October 31, 2005

In this Issue:

  1. Guidelines for Identifying and Referring Persons with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
      Source: CDC - MMWR Recommendations and Reports - October 28, 2005
  2. Study Explores Variation in Need and Service Use Among Young Children in Child Welfare
      Source: MCH Alert - October 28, 2005
  3. Protecting Children in Foster Care - A New Report from Casey Family Programs
      Source: Casey Family Programs - Retrieved October 28, 2005
  4. Taking a Closer Look: A Guide to Online Resources on Family Involvement
      Source: Harvard Family Research Project - October 2005

1. Guidelines for Identifying and Referring Persons with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Source: CDC - MMWR Recommendations and Reports - October 28, 2005

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) results from maternal alcohol use during pregnancy and carries lifelong consequences. In 2002, CDC convened a scientific working group (SWG) of persons with expertise in FAS research, diagnosis, and treatment to draft criteria for diagnosing FAS. This report summarizes the diagnostic guidelines drafted by the SWG, provides recommendations for when and how to refer a person suspected of having problems related to prenatal alcohol exposure, and assesses existing practices for creating supportive environments that might prevent long-term adverse consequences associated with FAS. The guidelines are intended to facilitate early identification of persons affected by prenatal exposure to alcohol so they and their families can receive services that enable them to achieve healthy lives and reach their full potential. This report also includes recommendations to enhance identification of and intervention for women at risk for alcohol-exposed pregnancies. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr5411a1.htm

2. Study Explores Variation in Need and Service Use Among Young Children in Child Welfare

Source: MCH Alert - October 28, 2005

This study "substantially expands our knowledge base regarding the developmental and behavioral needs and subsequent service use of young children in the CW [child welfare] system," state the authors of an article published in the October 2005 issue of Pediatrics. Several gaps remain in the research on the scope of the developmental and behavioral needs of the 4.5 million children throughout the nation referred to child welfare agencies each year. The study described in this article examines patterns of developmental and behavioral problems and corresponding early intervention service use among a nationally representative sample of young children in contact with U.S. child welfare agencies as the result of allegations of abuse or neglect. For more information go to http://www.mchlibrary.info/alert/2005/alert102805.html#4

[Originally published in MCHAlert © 2005 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

3. Protecting Children in Foster Care - A New Report from Casey Family Programs

Source: Casey Family Programs - Retrieved October 28, 2005

A new report, published by Casey Family Programs, demonstrates that proposed changes to Medicaid being considered by Congress significantly threaten the health and well-being of the 800,000 children and youth who spend time in the foster care system each year. The following three documents are available online at http://www.casey.org/Resources/Publications/Medicaid.htm:

  • Fact sheet—summary of the report's key observations and recommendations to Congress
  • Profiles of young adults formely in foster care—the stories of four former foster youth who accessed Medicaid while they were in care
  • Full report—examination of Medicaid's role in providing health care to children in foster care; detailed assessment of the Medicaid reform proposals now pending in Congress
Protecting Children in Foster Care was written by leading national health policy experts David Rubin, MD, MSCE; Neal Halfon, MD, MPH; Ramesh Raghavan, MD, PhD.; and Sara Rosenbaum, JD.

4. Taking a Closer Look: A Guide to Online Resources on Family Involvement

Source: Harvard Family Research Project - October 2005

There is more information on family involvement online than any one person can keep track of now. The Harvard Family Research Project has taken a closer look and compiled and categorized this large body of information in order to make it easier for practicing educators to access and use. This resource guide contains Web links to research, information, programs, and tools from over 100 national organizations. It provides information about parenting practices to support children's learning and development, home-school relationships, parent leadership development, and collective engagement for school improvement and reform. Available online at http://www.hfrp.org/projects/fine/resources/guide/guide.html