August 19, 2005

In this Issue:

  1. New Working Paper - Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain
      Source: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child - August 19, 2005
  2. New Guide for States and Communities Developing Quality Rating Systems for Early Care and Education
      Source: United Way SB6 - Retrieved August 19, 2005
  3. Prepared for Kindergarten: What Does "Readiness" Mean?
      Source: NIEER - Retrieved August 19, 2005
  4. Initiative Reports Provide Guidance to States in Early Childhood Health Policy
      Source: MCH Alert - August 19, 2005
  5. How Medical Claims Simplification Can Impede Delivery of Child Developmental Services
      Source: Commonwealth Fund - August 11, 2005

1. New Working Paper - Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain

Source: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child - August 19, 2005

A new working paper from the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child entitled Excessive Stress Disrupts the Architecture of the Developing Brain (2005) is now available online at http://www.developingchild.net/pubs/wp/Stress_Disrupts_Architecture_Developing_Brain.pdf

2. New Guide for States and Communities Developing Quality Rating Systems for Early Care and Education

Source: United Way SB6 - Retrieved August 19, 2005

The United Way of America Success By 6 program recently released a new guidebook entitled Stair Steps to Quality: A Guide for States and Communities Developing Quality Rating Systems for Early Care and Education. Available online at http://www.earlychildhoodfinance.org/downloads/2005/MitchStairSteps_2005.pdf

3. Prepared for Kindergarten: What Does "Readiness" Mean?

Source: NIEER - Retrieved August 19, 2005

A new policy report from the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) entitled Prepared for Kindergarten: What Does "Readiness" Mean? is now available online. The report examines key issues for public policy related to school readiness, the relationship between school readiness and other factors in young children's lives, and challenges in readying children for kindergarten. Go to http://nieer.org/docs/index.php?DocID=121

4. Initiative Reports Provide Guidance to States in Early Childhood Health Policy

Source: MCH Alert - August 19, 2005

The National Center for Infant and Early Childhood Health Policy has released four new reports designed to support the planning and implementation of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) State Early Childhood Comprehensive Services (SECCS) Initiative. The reports are intended to increase visibility of early childhood policy issues on the national agenda by synthesizing the policy relevance of emerging early childhood health issues, analyzing systems-building and programmatic issues, and disseminating the latest research findings. The reports examine infant mental health, maternal depression, cultural competence, and medical homes. To learn more and to access the reports, go to the full MCH Alert article at http://www.mchlibrary.info/alert/2005/alert081905.html#1

[Originally published in MCHAlert 2005 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

5. How Medical Claims Simplification Can Impede Delivery of Child Developmental Services

Source: Commonwealth Fund - August 11, 2005

According to a new Commonwealth Fund report, How Medical Claims Simplification Can Impede Delivery of Child Developmental Services, in order to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), state Medicaid agencies must eliminate some payment codes that have been tailored to the special needs of Medicaid-enrolled children. This process can lead to reduced coverage for mental health services, early intervention, physical and speech therapy, home care, case management, transportation, and other services not usually provided in private physician practices. The authors say that federal policymakers should consider revising the law so that states can preserve coverage of services targeting children at risk for developmental problems. To veiw the full report go to http://www.cmwf.org/usr_doc/Medical_Claims_Simplification.pdf