June 24, 2004

In this Issue:

1. Requests for Comments from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services [OSERS]

Source: Federal Register: June 22, 2004 (Volume 69, Number 119)

The following requests for comments from the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services [OSERS] were recently published in the Federal Register:

2. Article Assesses Screening Measure for Depression in Young Children

Source: MCH Alert - June 18, 2004

"The findings support the validity of the PFC [Preschool Feelings Checklist] as a screening measure for the identification of young children in need of clinical assessment for depression," state the authors of an article published in the June 2004 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. The authors point out that evidence is now available demonstrating that children as young as age 3 can experience a clinically significant episode of major depressive disorder (MDD) and that this highlights the need for a validated brief and feasible screening tool to capture young children from the general population who are in need of a clinical evaluation. Currently, such a tool is not available. In the study described in this article, the authors sought to develop and test the criterion validity (i.e., ability to discriminate between young children with and without a disorder) of a very brief checklist specifically designed to identify MDD in young children in community settings. For more information go to http://www.mchlibrary.info/Alert/2004/alert061804.html#5.

[Originally published in MCHAlertę 2004 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]

3. New Policy Briefs from the National Institute for Early Education Research [NIEER]

Source: NIEER - Retrieved June 24, 2004

The following new polcy briefs were recently published by the National Institute for Early Education Research:

4. Moving Forward: Head Start Children, Families, and Programs in 2003

Source: Center for Law and Social Policy - June 2004

This eight-page policy brief, the fifth in a series, offers the latest data available from Program Information Reports submitted to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services by all federal Head Start grantees. In 2003, Head Start continued to serve a diverse population of low-income children, mostly in working families. Head Start provided early education and a range of services to poor children and their families, including developmental and mental health screenings and special education and early intervention services. In 2003, more Head Start children had access to continuous medical and dental care than in previous years. Early Head Start children showed a particularly dramatic increase in access to dental care, rising from 47 percent in 2002 to 64 percent in 2003. To view the complete report online go to http://www.clasp.org/publications/hs_brf_5.pdf.

5. Authors Assess Clinicians' Perceptions of the Healthy Steps for Young Children Program

Source: MCH Alert - June 18, 2004

The findings of this study suggest that the Healthy Steps for Young Children Program (HS) "was successful in universally increasing developmentally oriented services across all income levels, as reported by clinicians, in a variety of settings," state the authors of an article published in the June 2004 issue of the Journal of Urban Health. The study described in the article examined whether HS changed clinicians' perceptions over time about the preventive primary care they provided. The article compares the change in perceptions of clinicians working in practice settings serving low-income families with young children to clinicians who served higher-income families with young children. For more information go to http://www.mchlibrary.info/Alert/2004/alert061804.html#4.

[Originally published in MCHAlertę 2004 National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health and Georgetown University. Reprinted with permission.]