November 9, 2018

In this Issue:

  1. Statewide Implementation Guide
      Source: Early Childhood Technical Assistance (ECTA) Center & National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations (NCPMI)
  2. Assistive Technology (AT) for Young Children
      Source: Let's Participate
  3. Five Elements of a Good Preschool
      Source: The Hechinger Report
  4. Language Experience in the Second Year of Life and Language Outcomes in Late Childhood
      Source: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)
  5. Taking Home Visiting to Scale - Special Issue
      Source: Maternal and Child Health Journal

1. Statewide Implementation Guide

Source: Early Childhood Technical Assistance (ECTA) Center & National Center for Pyramid Model Innovations (NCPMI)

The ECTA Center, in collaboration with NCPMI, recently developed the online Statewide Implementation Guide (2018) to support states with implementing evidence-based practices and to achieve positive outcomes for young children with disabilities and their families. Arranged into four support structures and four stages of implementation, the guide includes resources for state and local administrators, professional development coaches, and practitioners.

2. Assistive Technology (AT) for Young Children

Source: Let's Participate

The Let's Participate! Model Demonstration Program funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs offers resources to assist IDEA Part C and Part B preschool professionals to develop a child-specific AT program that increases participation among infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Information for how to set up an AT lending library is also included.

3. Five Elements of a Good Preschool

Source: The Hechinger Report

What should parents look for and what questions should they ask to determine if a preschool is high-quality? According to this recent Hechinger Report (October 2018), before choosing a preschool, there are five elements parents should seek:

  • A friendly, joyful atmosphere conducive to learning with multiple activity stations, building toys, art supplies, books, and props.
  • Teachers guiding academic growth, modeling positive behavior, and providing tools to assist children to manage their feelings.
  • Evidence of discipline and social-emotional skill development, including a quiet area for the child to relax
  • Children learning foundational academics in reading, math, science, and social studies through exploration and creative activities
  • Evidence of applied physical safety standards

The report also includes a list of observations and questions for parents to consider.

4. Language Experience in the Second Year of Life and Language Outcomes in Late Childhood

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

According to this article in Pediatrics (October 2018, Volume 142, Issue 4) a recent study of early language learning in 146 infants and toddlers revealed that early talk and "conversational turn-taking" during the developmental window of 18 to 24 months of age can predict later language and cognitive outcomes. The study further suggests that effective early intervention programs are those that help parents optimize an early language learning environment in the home.

5. Taking Home Visiting to Scale - Special Issue

Source: Maternal and Child Health Journal

This special Issue of the Maternal and Child Health Journal (October 2018, Volume 22, Issue 1), explores the findings from state-led evaluations of eleven Maternal, Infant & Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program awardees: Arkansas, Florida, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee. Four broad topics are discussed in the articles: 1) enhancing program quality and fidelity; 2) family engagement; 3) workforce development, and 4) the impact of evidence-based home visiting services.