August 31, 2018

In this Issue:

  1. Helping Children Cope and Children with Special Healthcare Needs in Emergencies
      Source: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD)
  2. DEC Recommended Practices Resources
      Source: Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children
  3. Preschool Development Grant Birth through Five (PDG B-5)
      Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF)
  4. A Head Start on Treating Our Nation's Opioid Epidemic
      Source: National Head Start Association (NHSA)
  5. Sharing Research Across Home Visiting and Early Care and Education (ECE) Better Serves Families (Blog)
      Source: Child Trends
  6. CEELO Leadership Academy: A Retrospective Review
      Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO)

1. Helping Children Cope and Children with Special Healthcare Needs in Emergencies

Source: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities (NCBDDD)

The NCBDDD and the Children's Preparedness Unit recently released these two new Spanish-language resources (June 2018) to assist parents, caregivers, and healthcare providers helping children with special healthcare needs to prepare or recover from a disaster.

The content is also available as a PDF.

2. DEC Recommended Practices Resources

Source: Division for Early Childhood (DEC) of the Council for Exceptional Children

The latest edition of DEC's Resources within Reason (July 2018) offers a list of resources for early care practitioners and families who wish to learn more about the DEC Recommended Practices. From background history and a glossary to practice guides and learning modules, this collection of links provides practical information for improving outcomes for children (age birth to 5 with or at-risk for disabilities) and their families.

For similar topics, visit the Resources within Reason archives at http://www.dec-sped.org/resources-within-reason.

3. Preschool Development Grant Birth through Five (PDG B-5)

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families (ACF)

The ACF invites applications from eligible States and Territories to carry out the activities of the Preschool Development Grant Birth through Five (PDG B-5). The PDG B-5 grant initiative will assist States to coordinate their existing early care and learning services and funding channels to provide equal opportunities and quality education for struggling children age birth to five. The estimated application due date is October 15, 2018.

4. A Head Start on Treating Our Nation's Opioid Epidemic

Source: National Head Start Association (NHSA)

According to a recent report from the NHSA (July 2018), Head Start programs have core elements in place that can help children and their families impacted by the opioid crisis. Core elements, such as parent engagement, community-driven solutions, and a holistic family-centered approach, have been successful at improving the coping skills for reducing the effects of trauma in young children and their families. The report provides background research, statistics and recommendations for early childhood administrators and policymakers.

5. Sharing Research Across Home Visiting and Early Care and Education (ECE) Better Serves Families (Blog)

Source: Child Trends

A recent blog entry from Child Trends (June 2018) explains the significance of sharing research across home visiting and ECE departments. It also states key questions for addressing how agencies can build and improve early childhood integrated data systems to better serve their families.

6. CEELO Leadership Academy: A Retrospective Review

Source: Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO)

This retrospective study released last month (July 2018) offers data analysis of the impact of CEELO's State Early Learning Leadership Academy, a professional development opportunity launched in 2014 designed to strengthen early childhood leadership competencies in state education agencies (SEA). The year-long Leadership Academy consisted of 21 participants across 15 states and included intensive structured activities, such as readings, job-embedded projects, coaching, journaling/reflecting, collaboration with peers and national experts, and team building exercises.